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The Catalina Islander
Avalon, California
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May 11, 1932     The Catalina Islander
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May 11, 1932
 

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EDITED BY JOURNALISM CLASS OF AVALON HIGH SCHOOL VOLUME VII AVALON HIGH SCHOOL, WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 1932 NUMBER J COMMERCIAL DEPT. TAKES CHARGE OF ASSEMBLY SEVENTH GRADE TAKES ATTENDANCERACE SENIORS CHOOSE LITTLE HAKI$OI r'OR PICNIC VARSITY LOSES FOURTH BASEBALL GAME Mr. A. C. King, head of the com- mercial department, took charge of the assembly last t, nday. He explained the many opportunities that typing gi';,es to the student, not only in the business world, but for efficient work in the university. Three demonstrations were given by ~tudents .of the first, second and third year tyl)ing classes, to compare the differentrates of speed. Virginia Feltrop, representing the first year, Catherine Marincovich, the second, and Edna Henson, the third year. Shorthand was next disclissed, and M r. King explained some useful pi~rases used in shorthand. A history of tile adding machine was then given and a summary of the arrcient habits of writing and account- inf. This was followed by the award- ipg .f tile prizes for those students sefling the most tickets for the oper- etta. Hilda Sahnon was awarded t'hat prize for the high school and Blanche Mackey was awarded the prize for the ch.tp~mtary school. A. H.S. !T'he first and second grade classes, taught by Miss Coleman, have a li- br~iry of their own for their social studies. Some of the books included -in this library are: "Little Black Sam- ~bo," "Chihtren's Corner," "Little Moth- er Goose," "Sung Primer," "Wide Awake Stories," "Through the Farm- yard Gate," "More Russian Picture "l~ales,'' "Aunt Green, Aunt Brown and Aunt Lavender, .... Fifty Indian Leg- e~tds," "Tale of Benjamin Bunny," "Story of Mrs. Tubbs," and various ot~lers. A. H. S. Murals with cows and goats as the main subjects are being made by the sixth grade, under the direction of Miss McLain. The murals are drawn on paper with white chalk, and then colored with various shades of chalk. The students have been studying cows aml goats for the last three weeks, in preparation for this project. A. H. ~. Upon completion the Torqua was sent to the printer last week and is expected to be circulated early in June. The Torqua is being dedicated to Superintendent Stephens this year. A. H. ~i. Penmanship tests are being taken by the sixth grade, in view o~ earning penmanship certificates. The testswill be over on May 20th. A. I"1. S. Miss Calhoun's class, the third grade, is making a circus The chil- dren are using cardboard boxes to make cages. A. H.S. SCRAPS FROM THE DIARY OF A BAT My goodness, what a racket ! I wtmder what those boys are arguing about, anyway. Well, what do you know about that--they're talking about me! What's that? So, I'm a mule- eared bat, am I? I'll show him. I'll just take a nip of his finger for that insult. I'll teach him to insult a leaf- nosed bat, as a matter of fact, the only one in the White's Landing mine. Oh,,ho, so he doesn't like that very well. 'Goodness, what's this shining object he's going to put me in now? It's rather stuffy and cramped in t, his thing these boys call a can, but anyway, it is a little darker and that horrible old sun doesn't hurt my sen- sitive eyes anymore. Gee, I wonder if I can find a place to go to sleep on, these sides are awful slippery. Ho hum, I guess there's no use trying to'. Glimb these walls so I'll just 'have to s'pend the day on the bottom. And with that, our queer little furry mammal fell into a deep sleep until nightfall should awaken him.--Harry Lilli~. Taking the school attendance race with a percentage of .42, the seventh grade last week led the field, when the results of the attendance records for the eighth school month, ending April 22 were announced. Tieing for second place, the senior class arid the freshman class each had a percentage of .37, and the junior class arid the eighth grade class tied for third place with a percentage of .33. Next in line was the tenth grade, which boasted of a percentage of .26, and the adjustment room was in last place with a percentage of one out of nine, or .11. Exact results, with number of per- fect records, and number in class are as follows : Senior class: Nineteen enrolled, sev- ell in perfect attendance: Robert Dun- kle, Harry Lillie, William Orr, Dick Welsch, Jane Dowdle, Edna Henson and Lilyan McGarry. Junior class: Twelve enrolled, four perfect attendance: Eric Wilcox, Cath- erine Marincovich, Enid Price, Muriel Rogers. Tenth grade : Nineteen enrolled, five perfect attendance: Charles Davis, Jesse Lindsey, Marion Johnson arid Marin Eldad. Ninth grade :Twenty-four enrolled, nine perfect attendance: Robert Orr, Virginia Allen, Agnes Conrad, Virginia Feltrop, Edith Knapp, Betty McGarry, Dorothy Schott, Katherine Winkleby and Dorothy WJnterbottom. Eighrh grade, twenty-two enrolled, seven perfect attendance: Angus Pat- terson, John White, Elizabeth Eding- ton, Helen Gibson, Maxine Jobe, Fran- cis Price, Louise Stamford.~ Seventh grade, twenty-one enrolled, nine perfect attendance: Philip Con- rad, Lee Grey, James Hudson, Susan Brooks, Mildred Edington, Katy Krue- gar and Hilda Salmon. Adjustment room: nine enrolled, one perfect attendance: Tony Hernandez. A. I..I.S. NEW BOOKS RECEIVED BY THE LIBRARIAN Miss Rex, librarian, received a ship- ment of books from Long Beach last week. The books are for the lower grades and were paid for with book fines collected in the library. One book that was a special bargain is "Pinocchio," by Collodi, a six dollar book reduced to two dollars nineteen cents. The other books, whose prices were also greatly reduced, are "An Ap- ple Pie," "Slovenly Peter," "Adven- tures of Niles," "Ollie Ostrich," "Jupe and the Wise Old O~I," "Black Beau- ty," "Little Dog Ready," and "Skitter Cat." A. H. S. The baseball diamond on the play- ground has been moved back fifty feet, because the holes in the pitchers' and batters' boxes have been rapidly en- larging, causing consternation among the players. Little Harbor has been chosen by the senior class as the place to hold their annual plcmc scheduled for May 12th. In order to see Wind could go, the faculty held a special teachers' meeting in which it was decided thk~t everyone could go if he or she desired. Mr. Meadows, senior class advisor, and Miss Elliott will accompany the group, which will leave the bus station at 9:00 o'clock. Everyone is to bring his own lunch and be dressed in suit- able clothes for what is expected to be an enjoyable day. ~.H. 5. The fourth grade social science class is studying "'I'he Land of Cotton." The study takes up cotton and how it was first started and grew as an industry. Care of parks and public beauty is also being studied, and the class will make a trip to the Bird Park next Monday, under Miss Grey's supervision, to study the care and gardening of trees, shrubs and flowers. *-~. P't. S. During hygiene period last Monday, Coach Brentford gave a short lecture to students who were so artistically inclined that they had to mark up the new wall erected in the patio of the gym building, with names that are supposed to be sarcastic. A. H. $. Beaks and claws of birds were stu- died last Thursday by the biology class, during a trip to the Bird Park. This trip is made every year to study the results of the bird's' environment. A. H, S. Virginia Lee Lavender and Enid Price are doing especially good work in the sewing class They are making new clothes out of discarded dresses and skirts. A. H. *a. The Girls' Glee Club sang for the Mothers' Day program, May 8th, at the Congregational Church. The mu- sical selection was "Nightfall," by Losing their fourth straight the Varsity baseball again went to defeat at the hands of the Island school 13-2, which is the defeat suffered this season. Peterson started the game for lon but was replaced in the ning by Lillie, who held Catalina two hits in the three innings that Avalon Position Cervantes c White I) Reyes lb Church ss Clark 2b Degidio ss Conrad 3b pitched. Gerald House replaced Nick covich as catcher, due to the bihty of Marincovich. Althou made eight errors, he played a good game behind the plate, as was the first game that he has Clyde Grant starred for with two 3-base hits to right while Bruce of Catalina, three bingles out of four times at Box Score Avalon-- AB H Smith, rf,. ................................... 1 0 Barba, lb, . ............................... 4 0 Grant, 3b ................................... 3 2 Burgess, ss,. ............... : ............ 3 1 Granteer ............................ : ...... 3 1 House, c, . ................................... 2 0 Welsch, 2b, . ............................ 3 1 Garcia, ss,. ................................ 1 0 Peterson, p,_ ............................ 1 0 Lillie, p, . .................................. 2 0 Conrad, cf ................................. 2 1 Total .................................... 25 6 Catalina School-- AB it Sloane, lf, . ................................ 4 1 Null, 3b, . .................................. 4 2 Bruce, e, . ................................. 4 3 Lawler, ss .............................. 2 0 Hoppet~. lb, . ............................ Beaver,'/cf,- ........................... 4 Wood, rf, . ............................... 4 0 Nottmeyer, 2b, . ...................... 3 1 Munroe, p, 4 0 Total 32 8 Two base hits: Bruce. hits, Bruce, Grant 2, Burgess. Errors: Conrad, Garcia, Edith Tillotson. A. H.S. House 8, Nottmeyer 2, Bruce 2. FOURTH VICTORY FOR Left on bases: Catalina 7, A~ Struck out : Peterson6, BEES OVER TOYON Munroe 5. Wild pitch : Peterson. The undefeated "B" squad took Toy- Hit by pitcher: Lawler by on for another loss in the baseball Walks: Peterson 6, Lillie game held at the high school groundsroe 4. last Wednesday. This is the fourth Earned runs: Catalina 3, victory for the squad and all games Losing pitcher: Peterson. were won with a high score, the lotter Umpire: Jimmy Glendye. being 17 to 3. Johnny White, John Reyes and Phil- Batting Averaqtr~ lip Conrad played an excellent game Player AB O t'I ofr Avalon. The line us was as fol- Welsc'hGranteer ............................... 1580035"4 lows : Burgess ............................... Toyon Coleman .............................. .............................. 93~ ~ WR. Robinson Marincovich ........................ 936 Robinson Nevarez ................................ Offield Grant ................................... i3 42 4 Peterson ............................... ~43~ Conrad .................................. Barba ...................................... 11 4 2 Engle Spaulding Van Court P. Douglass Vogel Rierden Trask Patterson and Allen cf Brooks rf Hernandez If STAFF Editor in Chief ............................................................................. Dick Welsch Advisor ...................................................................................... Mr. Meadows Reporters--F. Burgess, M. Boles, B. Dunkle, R. Feltrop, H. Lillie, A. Vnich, W. Orr, N. Mattson. EDITORIAL Reading The type of reading done by a per- son in the home plays an important part in his cultural development. It is a mistake to follow one line of reading to the exclusion of all others. Reading should not be considered sole- ly in the light of entertainment, but should be accompanied by a desire for enlightenment on different subjects. One of the keynotes of character development is tolerance of other peo- ple's views. In order to be tolerant one must understand thoroughly the subject under discussion, so that argu- ments may be weighed with an open mind and not condemned immediately through narrow-minded prejudice, and this tolerance can only be obtained through expansive and comprehensive reading.--M etropolitan Mirror. Smith ................................... 7 3 1 Lillie .................................... 6 3 0 House ................................... 2 1 0 Garcia .................................. 3 3 0 A. H.S. WILD FLOWERS AS BY CLYDE GIBSON An unusually conlplete the wild flowers on Catalina has been made by Clyde Gibson part of his biology work. The pressed and neatly pasted in a leaf notebook with a label under plant telling its name and habitS: A good many of the rarer were taken from the flower as the dogwood, tree poppy at of the rarer ferns. His work in biology is a credit to his Clyde's collection of insects ly due to astonishing efforts (Continued on page 10, column