Newspaper Archive of
The Catalina Islander
Avalon, California
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May 7, 1924     The Catalina Islander
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May 7, 1924
 

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PAGE SIX THE CATALINA WINDLE'S PRINT SHOP Published Every Wednesday at AVALO I~, - CALIFORNIA. E. WINDLE.-- - Editor and Owner CHAS. H. SMITH Associate Editor SUBSCRIPTION RATES (in advance). Three Years .............................. Five Dollars (Only When Paid in Advance). One Year .................................... Two Dollars Six Months .................................... One Dollar Three Months ............................... Fifty Cents Single Copies ................................ Five Cents ADVERTISING RATES Display Advertising $0c per Inch, Each Insertion... 500 Inches Dur/ng a Period of Six Months, S$c per Inch. Liners 10c per Line, Minimum 25c. Entered as Second-Class Matter March 31, 1914, st the Postnll$ce st Avalon, Calif. Under the Act of March S, 1897. The columns of the Islander are open to the general public, on any of the fol- lowing subjects: Local Pollt/cs and Gov- ernmen, Fishing, Hunting and Camping. Items of local news intere-st will be greatly appreciated. NATURALIZATION CLASS In conformity with the requirements for citizenship a course of study in the constitution of the United States is required: Such a course is being organized for Avalon. Mr. Dunkle requests that all those who have taken out their first papers and are getting ready for naturaliza- tion should meet at the high school, at the Casino, Wednesday 'evening, May 7th, at 7:30. C. F. Richey has brought his float- ing boat-repairing shop over from San Pedro, and it is anchored in the bay for the summer. The speedboat, "Miss Catalina I" has been placed in commission for the season, and gives additional life to the waters of Avalon bay and vicinity. By reference to the Strand Theatre program, published on page two, our readers will note that another one of Zane Grey's popular books will be pie- turized on the screen on Monday ev- ening of next week--May 12th--"The U. P. Trail." Frank Burnham informes us that the Cauldron Club of Pasadena will put on a full evening's entertainment of song and drama on Saturday even- ing, May 10th, through K H J. There are sixty male voices in the club, and the entertainment promises to be an interesting one for radio "listeners-in." Attention of the many angler read- ers of the Catalina Islander is called to the advertisement on page four of the South Bend Bait Co., of 522 High street, South Bend, Indiana. Present- ed in this advertisement are illustra- tions of artificial lures used in taking salt water fish of various varieties knd sizes--such as swordfish, tuna, tarpon, barracuda, albacore, bonita, grouper, etc. Also the Sea-Oreno linen Cutty- hunk line, in sizes 6 to 36-thread. Latest reports ate to the effect that the Long Beach School District bonds have been sold; that the architect's j~lans for the $50,000 building for the Catalina schools have been approved, andl that bids have been asked for. Goo~ [ Now, without prejudice to other bidders, we hope that the Santa Catalina~:!Istand Company will receive the contract. Then we can feel quite certain that the new building will be completed in time for th~ opening of school next fall. More progress! STEAMSHIP "CATALINA" LAUNCHED SATURDAY (Continued from Page 1, Column 3) horsepower, burning oil as fuel. Four boilers of the 13W navy type will en- able the palatial steamship to cross the channel at a speed of seventeeen knots per hour. From the dock at 'Wilmington to the dock at Avalon the time will be one hour and forty-five minutes. The new vessel will be in command of Captain A. A. Morris, commodore of the Wihnington Trans- portation Company's fleet of vessels. "PRINCESS" LAUNCHED The Wihnington Transportation Co's latest addition to their glass-bottom boat fleet, the motorship "Princess," was launched Tuesday evening of last week at the Muller Ship Yards at Wil- mington. Miss Marguerite Brown of Los Angeles sponsored the new craft as it slid into the water. In attend- ance at the ceremonies were Mr. Mil- ton S. Patrick, manager of the Glass- Bottom Boat and Excursion Trips, Captain Claude Walton, as well as other officials of the Wilmington Transportation Company. The "Princess" is faster and more powerful than any of the older glass bottom boats; is similar in design but not quite so large as the "Emperor," and will carry 132 passengers. For night submarine garden trips it is equipped with powerful searchlights in the under Wells, and in addition is mounted with an eight-million c~mdle power light to display flying fish. It is expected that the "Princess" will be placed in service at Avalon within the next few weeks. "A JOY FOR EVER." Flying the colors of the new Cata- lina Yacht Club, the cabin cruiser "Ra- meses" arrived in Avalon harbor Wed- nesday afternoon. On board the trim craft as guests of the owner, were G. B. Wilson, F. S. Calkins, Ed Abbott and James W. Jump. Mr. Ramsey is first vice-president of the new organ- ization. He is also chairman of the Racing Committee of the Newport Harbor Yacht Club. The new building of the Catalina Island Yacht Club, which is located at the foot of Hill street, is, as Secretary Abbott says: "Now looming up magnificiently. It's a thing of beauty and joy forever." We have received an interesting and neat little booklet describing the Toy- on Camp for Girls, a vacation camp on the shores of Catalina Island, three miles west of Avalon. Swimming and water sports, riding, tennis, golf, bas- ketball, archery, target shooting, hik- ing, horseback riding, dancing, etc., are among the pleasures outlined. Then there is an opportunity to take part in arts and crafts, or to receive private tutoring. Notwithstanding the dryness of the season there are some yellow violets in blossom in sheltered localities. These beautiful blossoms are also known as yellow pansies and Califor- nia violets. The botanical name is "Viola pedunculata." Workmen are busy grading at the Greek Amphitheatre, providing room for a substantial addition to its seat- ing capacity. The improvements will be completed before the commence- ment of the nightly concerts the later part of June. Bill Killefer, pilot of the Chicago Cubs, generously donated Milt Patrick, Catalina Cub's prexy, with a complete outfit of major league apparel. Com- paring appearances on the field, the local organization was surely a sight for sore eyes; neatness caused"con- siderable attraction; while the visitors represented several clubs under one banner. Each player was clothed in entirely different costumes and they looked more like a masquerade party than a ball club. In a wierd, "wild, and whirling con- test, the Catalina Cubs managed to overpower the Bayer-Rothgeb Co., 10 to 6; however, the tilt provided enough thrills, keeping spectators cheering and jeering throught nine eventful frames. Had Ringling Bros. been among those present at Sunday's performance, they would have secured available talent. Tumblers and acrobats were plentiful; hence the management, Mih P~ttrick and his worthy assistants, should erect a mammotfi circus tent. Seriously speaking, the Islanders played brill- iantly at times, and by their aggress- iveness won many admirers. Comedy of Errors Bill Shakespeare must have obtained his inspiration from the National pas- time when he wrote that memorial drama, the "Comedy of Errors." The industrial leaguers from Los Angeles portrayed said characters on the ball diamond, kicking away easy chances during critical stages of the games, and had Huffaeker, their star hurler, been given ordinary support the out- come might have been a pitchers' duel. The locals were guilty of several harm- ful misplays, especially when Bill Doran dropped a thrown ball from "Lucky" Lugo, the result being two runners crossing the plate on an or- dinary simple put-out. Such thrills are uncalled for. Nevertheless, Lugo showed the throng that he worked bet- ter while under fire, and his stellar exhibition on the mound was a revela- tion to baseball lovers and authorities. Carlisle, Same Old Walter One of the greatest outfielders in the history of the Coast League was Walter Carlisle. For years he wore a Vernon uniform, always lead off, be- cause of his exceptional ability to out- smart opposing slabsters, as well as making famous shoe-string catches in the outer-garden. Carlisle's greatest contribution to baseball happened to be a triple play unassisted, which won a prominent place for him in the Hall of fame. Men of his type are a fitting example for younger atheletes whose ideal is clean baseball. Timely Blows Net Victory "Chuck" Curmingham's war club caused the downfall of the enemy. Time and again the little giant came through with crashing blows ,in the pinches, chasing outfielders to all cor- ners of Wrigley Field. His timely triple saved the day for the Cubs. Swatting the proverbial apple viciously when hits meant runs, and bagging long drives when a bobblemay have lost the "game, the Catalina Cubs dis- played wholesome fighting st characterizes the rudiments league club. The following was the CATALINA CUBS AB R H Carlysle, rf ................... 5 1 2 McDowell, cf ............... 3 2 0 Doran, lb ..................... 5 3 1 Cunningham, ss ......... 3 1 1 O'Shea, 3b ................... 2 2 1 Pfahler, 2b ................... 4 1 2 Gould, c ....................... 3 0 1 Crandall, If ................... 3 0 Kenny, p ....................... 3 0 0 Lugo, L. p ................... 1 0 0 Total ........................ ~ ~ "8 BAYER-ROTHGER cO Barnes, 3b ................... A3B lRH1 Vidos, cf ....................... 4 1 1 Arnot, ss ....................... 4 1 2 Gayetty, c ..................... 4 1 ~ 1 Berg, !f ......................... 3 1 0 Molinary, lb ................. 2 0 0 Houser, rf ................... 4 1 0 Gingig, 2b .................. 4 0 0 I-Iauffacker, p ............. 4 0 0 Total ........................ 32 6 5 SCORE BY INNINGS Runs, Cub ................. Hits, Cubs :...-.~ ......... 5 1 0 0 0 1 Runs, Bayer-R. CO ..... ~ 0 1 0 0 0 Hits, Bayer-R. Co... 2 0.0 0It' SUMMARY Innings pitched by Kenny Huffaeker 9; Home Runs, hits, Cunningham; Sacrifice 2, Cunningham 1, Gould 1, 1 ; Sacrifice flys, Doran 1 ; Off Kenn~. 8, Lu~o 3, off IKenny n, out. by Earned runs, Cubs O'Shea 3, Pfahler ham 2, Berg 1, Gayett: 1; Left on bases, Cubs pitcher Kenny ; Hits i, off Huffaker 8. Time of gaffe Umpires--Pickering and Willi A. W. McDowell, Scorekeeper. Boots and Binglns Jim Kenny and "Lucky" lightened the fans with their ment of stuff. What a Jim's fast ball and "Lucky's" curves! They assure plenty for hitters who invade the Isle" with reputations. Taking advantage of every tunity seems to be a habit Cubs. Crafty base running ningham, O'Shea and Pfahler the gamg, while "heads up" reigned at all times during the gle. For the visitors, Huffacker well; Berg, the leaping left made several sensational while Gayetty, the slugging crashed a home run with two on in the first inning. CATALINA CUBS Catalina Cubs ............................ 4 COAST LEAGUE San Francisco .......................... g" Vernon ...................................... 18 Salt Lake .................................. 15 Portland .................................... 14 Los Angeles .............................. 12 Oaltland ...................................... 12 Seattle ........................................ I0 Sacramento .............................. 9 NATIONAL LEAGUE W New York ................................ Cincinnati .................................. I~ 65 Chicago ...................................... Brooklyn .................................... ~ Pittsburg .................................... 1 Boston ........................................ St. Louis .................................. 5 IS Philadelphia .............................. $ 10 AMERICAN LEAGUE J New York ................................ I0 7 Chicago ...................................... 9 8 Detroit ........................................ 9 Boston .......................................... 7 1 St. Louis .................................... $ 9 Washington .............................. 8 9 Cleveland .................................. 6 $ Philadelphia .............................. 6 9 "In all the world no trip like just think of the advertised a two-day trip to Catalina, what is included for the sum and then tell us where else c~O get as much for the money.