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The Catalina Islander
Avalon, California
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March 21, 2014     The Catalina Islander
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March 21, 2014
 

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Native Plant Garden helps in the process COURTESY OF THE CATALINA ISLAND CONSERVANCY Every school day, the preschool students arriving at Catalina Kid Ventures pass directly by a beauti- ful new garden filled with native Catalina plants from the Catalina Island Conservancy's Ackerman Native Plant Nursery. Most of the children are too young to understand what "native plant" means, let alone "endemic," a species found in a particular area and nowhere else. However, they can learn a few things about biology, plants and the interde- pendent nature of our world from their garden. "The children learn from this garden that plants need water and rain, and that they require sunlight to grow," said Elizabeth Madden, Catalina Kid Ventures director. "They understand that the birds eat the berries of some of the plants as well." This is but one of many educational opportunities the Conservancy provides for Catalina's youth. From its Kids in Nature after-school programs for younger students to its Rose Ellen Gardner Internship for high school students, the Conservancy provides a wide variety of educa- tion and outdoor _programs for young people at no charge. The Conservancy's nursery also provides Catalina native plants f, ree of ch,ar, ge to replace any high- ly invasive species at schools, like Catalina Kid Ventures, business- es, civic groups and other com- munity organizations throughout Avalon and Two Harbors. Highly invasive plants are those that the Conservancy seeks to eliminate in the Island's wildlands: flax-leaf broom, French broom, pampas grass, fennel and others. These donations are an impor- tant part of the plant nursery's and the Conservancy's Catalina Habitat Improvement and Restoration Program (CHIRP) efforts to encourage sustainable landscaping practices. While CHIRP is primarily focused on eliminating invasive plants in the Conservancy's wildlands, this effort helps make people more aware of the threat as well as the solution. Together they encourage the removal of invasive species from Avalon by offering native trees and shrubs as replacements. The plant nursery's offer to provide native plants also recently found willing partners with the Los Angeles County Baywatch staff and the City of Avalon. Highly invasive pampas grass was removed from City Hall and the Baywatch facility on Avalon Canyon Road and replaced with native shrubs. The nursery pro- vided plants to Joe Machado Field along Avalon Canyon Road, and it's been asked to provide street trees to the City of Avalon. At the preschool, deer had browsed most of the plants in its garden. The remaining plants had been neglected. With the support of the City of Avalon and Catalina Kid Ventures, the Conservancy helped create a beautiful new garden that features a native Catalina toyon tree, als0 known as Christmas-berry, as well as Catalina silver lace, Catalina cur- rant and Catalina liveforever -- a species only found on the Island. The new native plant demonstra- tion garden is protected by a fence to keep the deer out. "We're proud of what-we have here, and this garden is just anoth- er reason for that," Madden said. "We're glad that the Conservancy Elizabeth Madden, left, director of Catalina Kid Ventures, poses with the preschool's students along with Ackerman Native Plant Nursery Supervisor Peter Dixon, center right, and Conservancy horticulture technician Rebecca Cano.Courtesy of the Catalina Island Conservancy Avalon High sports teams earn hi Several springs sports pro- grams at Avalon High received high placement on the CIF polls, which came out of updates on the sports programs. The Avalon baseball squad received the No. 7 ranking - between No. 6 Cate and No. 8 Coast Union. The Lancers (2-2) are led by athletic director Patti brbug-hCTIi'e~'~alfitits hEt~.ThCcllii-' ;~Efig~[. They,dropped a: double- dren like them." . .'_ : -header on March 15, falling to Southlands Christian by the score High softball team landed in the of 13-3 (mercy rule) and 5-3 in No. 9 spot behind Firebaugh but non-league action on the road. just in front of No. 10 Coast Union The Lancers looked like they - in the division-VII selection. might pull off a win during the The squad did stumble against second game. First, they went in St. Anthony, which won a double- front 1-0 in the first and expanded header with two mercy rules in the deficit to 3-0 in the top of place. The first game ended with the third. However, their oppo- an 18-4 score and the second fin- nent trimmed the deficit to 3-2 ished at 17-4. in the bottom half of the frame. Avalon will battle Webb Southlands Christian then plated School (Claremont) on March 21 three runs in the fifth while Avalon at home. could never generate another run The Avalon High boys' volley- after the third, ball team failed to snag an open- Avalon will try to snap the los- 1.'ng in the top 10. It did receive an ing streak with a contest against honorable mention in division-V, Albert Einstein Academy in non- which includes bigger schools like league play on March 22. - :-- - -- N6~ 1-Saddlebaek Valley Christian In other action, the Avalon and No. 2 Garden Grove. ........................................ " ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ #riciayl iqarch 2a}i2iJ'i4:is THE CATALINA ISLANDER